Australian Federal Police International Criminal Investigations

Whilst the Australian Federal Police (AFP) has primary responsibility for Commonwealth law enforcement, its investigational capacity is not without limits. The AFP’s Case Categorisation and Prioritisation Model (CCPM) assists in identifying and directing resources to matters of the highest priority, while rejecting other matters for investigation, in line with key strategic priorities.

 

How is the CCPM used?

In a recent communication, the AFP states that the CCPM considers:

  • The incident/crime type
  • The impact of the matter on Australian society
  • The importance of the matter
  • The resources required by the AFP to undertake the matter

 

Incident/crime type

The incident type is a means of grouping similar matters. Incident types include:

Child Sex Offences Environmental Crime Other Commonwealth Crime
Child Sex Offences – Online Exploitation Family Law People Smuggling
Child Sex Offences – Travelling Child Sex Offender Federal Parolee Performance & Image Enhancing Drugs (PIEDs)
Commonwealth Property/Premise Offence Firearms Protection
Corporate or Bankruptcy Fraud Protection – CPP Australian Office Holder
Corruption Harming Australians Protection – CPP Non-Australian Office Holder
Counterfeit Currency Human Trafficking Sanctions
Crimes at Sea Identity Crime Telecommunications and Postal
Criminal Assets Intellectual Property Terrorism – Diversion
Cyber Crime Intelligence Terrorism – Domestic
Dangerous Goods International Terrorism – Financing
Domestic LEA Requests Judicial orders or processes Terrorism – Foreign Incursion
Drugs – Exported Migration Crime Terrorism – International
Drugs – Imported Missing Person Threats to Aviation
Drugs – Precursors – Exported Money Laundering Tobacco – smuggling
Drugs – Precursors – Imported Mutual Assistance and Extradition Training
Drugs – Trafficked Offences against Commonwealth Officials Weapons, other than firearms
Electoral Crime Offences against Humanity Witness Protection

 

 

Impact of the matter on Australian society

This refers to the perceived impact of the matter on Australian society. Impact is categorised as:

 

Very high

Examples include:

  • Terrorism and national security
  • Economic crime (including money laundering) affecting the whole of government agency or valued at more than $5 million
  • Multiple commercial drug importation
  • Cyber Crime targeting national infrastructure

 

High

Examples include:

  • Impacting on multiple agencies, the system of government or government policy
  • Economic crime (including money laundering) affecting the whole of a government agency or valued at more than $1 million
  • Commercial drug importation
  • Corruption by a public official (including within Australia and bribery of a foreign official in other countries)

 

Medium

Examples include:

  • Economic crime (including money laundering) affecting a government agency within a region or valued at more than $0.25 million
  • Trafficable drug importation
  • Media/political interest

 

Low

Examples include:

  • Less than a trafficable quantity of drugs
  • Personal nuisance
  • Mandatory requirement, including judicial processes

 

The importance of the matter

This refers to the importance of the matter to both the client and the AFP in terms of the roles assigned to them by Government.

 

Impact to Client

Client impact and priority is categorised as:

Critical: a matter is politically sensitive or goes to central issues of management of an agency or a program

Significant: a serious or complex crime has been committed which the agency cannot resolve without AFP involvement

Routine: AFP investigation is desirable

Not Applicable: where impact to client is not relevant or appropriate

On Merit: no default value – the impact is assessed on a case by case basis

Other: matters where no alternative course of action is available

 

 

Value to AFP

Value to the AFP is a measurement of the extent to which a particular matter matches the AFP’s role as defined by its Ministerial Direction and other Government policy such as the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework. It can be summarised as the investigation of serious or complex matters affecting the Commonwealth’s interests. Importance to the AFP is categorised as:

 

High

These are matters that have a high degree of relevance to the AFP. Such matters could include those:

  • With a ‘High’ or ‘Very High’ impact that require significant investigative capabilities
  • Related to emerging criminality such as attacks on e-commerce systems
  • Relating to a strategic AFP target who is involved in other activity of interest to the AFP
  • Which will allow the AFP to enhance relationships for future serious matters

 

Medium

These matters would include:

  • ‘Medium’ impact matters that require significant investigate skill
  • Matters that provide an opportunity for developing AFP employees
  • Leveraging resources through assisting another agency investigation

 

Low

These matters would include:

  • ‘Low’ impact matters
  • Matters where there is little likelihood of success
  • Matters where an alternative approach is considered more appropriate

 

Outside of the AFP’s role

These matters are not relevant to AFP’s outcomes and are outside the AFP’s core business and/or jurisdiction.

Nyman Gibson Miralis specialise in complex criminal law cases investigated by the AFP, as well as multiple domestic and international law enforcement and regulatory agencies.

Contact us if you require assistance.